2017/2018

Discussions, Stories, Hints & Tips about everything outdoors. Biking, Hiking, Fishing, Shooting, Camping etc.
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Knut
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby Knut » December 18th, 2017, 3:53 pm

Nice story, MooseHunter! Seems like the harvester did the drive extra for you :D
Waidmannsheil.

InstinctiveArcher wrote:Wow, only 23 pounds? That's pretty small.

That's actually quite decent for a Roe fawn in december. In our region they're more often around 6-8kg (12-16 pounds) field dressed.

How much boneless meat does one get out of that? I have no idea, because most of the time we don't remove the bones from shoulder, hind quarter etc as they're a nice roast in one piece and the bone gives taste and keeps the meat juicy.
A hind quarter of a roe fawn will come in at around 1kg. The back probably 1.5 kg and the shoulders aren't much. Maybe half a kilo. So your calculation might be pretty close to the mark.
“Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.'" ― Isaac Asimov
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gas56
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby gas56 » December 19th, 2017, 12:03 am

@Moosehunter
last Saturday was the bonus week-end hunt for deer gun season in Ohio,...which usually comes in 2 weeks after the main deer gun season.
I was using my .357 and have to really get a pretty close shot to shoot a deer. I saw a lot of does but one small deer came about 30 feet away and stopped and stared right at me while I had
raised my handgun and could have shot it. I changed my mind and let it run off,.. because it was one of this years young fawns that was born this last spring and I couldn't
see using a tag on a 60-70 pound Whitetail deer and that's before it's field dressed. I know Roe deer are small but it hadn't dawned on me of how much meat you only get out of a 23 pound deer.
But venison is venison no matter how you look at it.
And I'm glad you also found that duck.

@Knut
it's been awhile since I've seen you around this forum again, welcome back.
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InstinctiveArcher
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby InstinctiveArcher » December 19th, 2017, 12:10 am

Gas echoes my thoughts pretty well. With all the time and work I put into getting a deer, I don't think that I would be able to shoot a small deer and make it worth it. Granted our whitetails are quite a bit larger, and what we get off of a yearling might be the same as what you get off of a full grown roe. I shot a fawn one year on accident. It came in by itself right at last light and without other deer around, I misjudged how big it was. I'll bet that what little meat you get off of a deer that small is very good though!


So long as the new moon returns in heaven a bent, beautiful bow, so long will the fascination of archery keep hold of the hearts of men. - Maurice Thompson
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Bong_Boy
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby Bong_Boy » December 19th, 2017, 12:25 am

gas56 wrote:@ Bong_Boy
Interesting hunting season you had!
I like it.


Thanks! It was a lot of fun first year I actually put effort into waterfowl but it’s a ton of fun!
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby Bong_Boy » December 19th, 2017, 12:26 am

InstinctiveArcher wrote:Looks like you had a pretty good season! Congrats!


Thanks!
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby Bong_Boy » December 19th, 2017, 12:34 am

Violator31 wrote:Bong_Boy, looks like your hunting went well this year. Congrats.
I've never done any waterfowl hunting but I have a few friends who do, it seems like it isn't too productive here (they do much better when they travel to hunt).
I wish the "leg tags" would be introduced into this game as "treasures". It has been suggested a few times but I don't know if it's ever gotten any serious consideration.


Thanks! Yeah my season was a lot of fun this year, me and my neighbor both live out a farm so we have a lot of private land to hunt on and this was the first year that I actually put effort into waterfowl. We split the costs on 170 or so decoys and lay down blinds rip my wallet :lol:

I love the leg bands there are some hunters that have been geese/duck hunting for 16 years and never seen one I guess I just got lucky :lol:

I would love to have these leg bands in game and maybe after shooting one you would get a page of the information on the bird And have it be rare like 1 in 200 geese/ducks?
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Knut
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby Knut » December 19th, 2017, 4:07 am

InstinctiveArcher wrote:Gas echoes my thoughts pretty well. With all the time and work I put into getting a deer, I don't think that I would be able to shoot a small deer and make it worth it.

That's the difference between a public land tag system and a territorial management system like we have it here in Germany (and other European countries).
If I'd only have a tag to fill, I would also choose my target animal by size and amount of meat.
But if you manage a population and a healthy age structure with it, then taking fawns is an integral part of it. We have to take a certain number of deer per assigned hunting ground -or a shoot as the Brits call it- and those have to be certain numbers (normally ~50%) within the juvenile age class (1 year olds and fawns). And waiting for the fawns to get one year doesn't make much of a difference. Next spring they won't be any heavier than at the beginning of winter and afterwards when the adults start to defend their territories, it's often hard to get the weaker younglings, as they're hiding out or wandering off to the bad habitats not defended by the old ones.
And many even end up as road kill in the process.

In out shoot for example, we aim to take only fawns and weak yearlings and then let the strong ones grow old and take the mature bucks at 4-5 years minimum. Does are being taken along as double takedowns with their weak fawns, whenever possible.
This kind of management helps to maintain a healthy population with a healthy age structure in which bucks can find and defend a territory in which they can mature and grow old. Roe are extremely territorial.
This type of management has lead to Germany having one of the highest densities of wild game in Europe despite of it being one of the most densely populated countries, too.

Yes, that means taking down animals that offer very little meat, but there's a reason Roe deer are traditionally classified as small game, I guess.
Mature roes come in at normally somewhere between 12-18kg (25-40 lbs), in perfect habitats and in the northern countries they can be a bit heavier.


gas56 wrote:@Knut
it's been awhile since I've seen you around this forum again, welcome back.

Thanks, mate!
Yeah, I've been fed up with the game for a while. Still, a hunter's blood is pumping through my veins :D
“Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.'" ― Isaac Asimov
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Knut
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby Knut » December 19th, 2017, 4:28 am

MooseHunter330 wrote:As I plucked it's feathers later that day, I saw that only two of the size 1 pellets had hit the bird.

I must've over read that the first time. That's quite big for waterfowling, isn't it?
I am only very occasionally bird hunting, but my friend use size 3 or 4 even for geese. "Deckung trumpft Schrotstärke" is the favourite saying of one of them. (Translates roughly to "spread/coverage trumps pellet size", I guess.)

Is the cormorant that tough a bird that you need penetration so desperately? Or is your Mossberg simply chambered in 12/89 so you don't care and have plenty of spread with even such big pellets?
“Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.'" ― Isaac Asimov
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MooseHunter330
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby MooseHunter330 » December 19th, 2017, 10:00 am

Cormorants are darn tough. We started out shooting them with 5 size shot and they didn't even blink.
My theory is, that they have very tough feathers due to the fact that they have no "Pürzeldrüse" I think it's called Uropygial gland (?).
Spends all the gold and money to buy new weapons in the shape of guns.
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InstinctiveArcher
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Re: 2017/2018

Postby InstinctiveArcher » December 19th, 2017, 10:56 am

Come over here and shoot all the cormorants you want! They are a menace to the fish population. It used to be legal to shoot them, but I don't know if it is still is or not.


So long as the new moon returns in heaven a bent, beautiful bow, so long will the fascination of archery keep hold of the hearts of men. - Maurice Thompson

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