Guide to Game development.

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Dukkers
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Guide to Game development.

Postby Dukkers » November 12th, 2015, 8:57 am

Just a thought that struck me reading the forums.

If the staff could post a breakdown the work that goes into different changes in the game as well as what positions are involved in doing them. It might give the members a better understanding of what goes on.

Example: reskinning versus new weapons.

Another would be what is required to change animal appearances.
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snakeyes32
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Re: Guide to Game development.

Postby snakeyes32 » November 12th, 2015, 9:17 am

Somewhere on here is a pic of the whole team and what jobs they do i can't find it at the moment. I can breakdown the basic's of what each job position does. As far as the rest it might be kind of hard to explain what you want to know in a form people would understand. I also don't think there going to take the time to try to explain it with the amount of work they have to do.

Designer
A game designer is a person who designs gameplay, conceiving and designing the rules and structure of a game. Development teams usually have a lead designer who coordinates the work of other designers. They are the main visionary of the game. One of the roles of a designer is being a writer, often employed part-time to conceive game's narrative, dialogue, commentary, cutscene narrative, journals, video game packaging content, hint system, etc. In larger projects, there are often separate designers for various parts of the game, such as, game mechanics, user interface, characters, dialogue, etc.

Artist
A game artist is a visual artist who creates video game art. The art production is usually overseen by an art director or art lead, making sure their vision is followed. The art director manages the art team, scheduling and coordinating within the development team.

The artist's job may be 2D oriented or 3D oriented. 2D artists may produce concept art, sprites, textures, environmental backdrops or terrain images,and user interface. 3D artists may produce models or meshes, animation, 3D environment, and cinematics. Artists sometimes occupy both roles.

Programmer
A game programmer is a software engineer who primarily develops video games or related software (such as game development tools). The game's codebase development is handled by programmers. There are usually one to several lead programmers, who implement the game's starting codebase and overview future development and programmer allocation on individual modules.

Individual programming disciplines roles include:

Physics – the programming of the game engine, including simulating physics, collision, object movement, etc.;
AI – producing computer agents using game AI techniques, such as scripting, planning, rule-based decisions, etc.
Graphics – the managing of graphical content utilization and memory considerations; the production of graphics engine, integration of models, textures to work along the physics engine.
Sound – integration of music, speech, effect sounds into the proper locations and times.
Gameplay – implementation of various games rules and features (sometimes called a generalist);
Scripting – development and maintenance of high-level command system for various in-game tasks, such as AI, level editor triggers, etc.
UI – production of user interface elements, like option menus, HUDs, help and feedback systems, etc.
Input processing – processing and compatibility correlation of various input devices, such as keyboard, mouse, gamepad, etc.
Network communications – the managing of data inputs and outputs for local and internet gameplay.
Game tools – the production of tools to accompany the development of the game, especially for designers and scripters.

Sound engineer
Sound engineers are technical professionals responsible for sound effects and sound positioning. They sometimes oversee voice acting and other sound asset creation. Composers who create a game's musical score also comprise a game's sound team, though often this work is outsourced.

I think i might be missing one or 2 position's like Alena Rybik i know what she does but i forget her title.
Edit: Community Manager that's her title.
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Dukkers
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Re: Guide to Game development.

Postby Dukkers » November 12th, 2015, 10:11 am

Oh I know what goes into it. As well as who does what.

I was just thinking they could have an intern write up an overview of the process as an learning experience.

It might make it easier for them to explain things like the reskinning compared to a new weapon issue.

Actually a modder from another game could most likely shed a lot of light on the processes involved so that laymen could understand it.
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snakeyes32
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Re: Guide to Game development.

Postby snakeyes32 » November 12th, 2015, 7:37 pm

Ah i see yeah not sure if they have any intern's but i understand now. Guess it could help people understand the amount of work that goes into diff things as it deff is not the same.
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L3M182
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Re: Guide to Game development.

Postby L3M182 » November 12th, 2015, 8:16 pm

well at one point there were frequent AMAs (ask me anythings) with the devs. they were great at getting long asked questions answered. i made a topic about it a few months back and Alena asked who would we like to question. nothing ever materialized though. id love for the AMAs to make a comeback. Really interesting, and really helpful you do get a sense of whats in the pipe line and whats going on. now pims been replaced i wonder if the direction has changed any.

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